AWS

Download a private GitHub Repo using AWS Lambda

As mentioned in this post I needed to download a private GitHub repo as a ZIP file. The GitHub repo containing this blog is now set to private (mainly to protect my backlog of drafts), which broke my AWS Lambda function (see here and here). Minimal changes were required from the functioning code, but there was a lot of testing. Some key changes were: Setting the GitHub Personal Access Token as a Lambda variable Modify the file download function to use custom headers Consuming the token from within Lambda to access and download the file The new function to download the repo:

Reference list of vRealize Automation's public cloud blueprint objects

I had a customer recently ask me what vRealize Automation (vRA) 8.1 was able to manage in the public cloud when using blueprints. While I had a very good idea as I’ve got it running in my homelab, I didn’t have any online reference list that I could direct them to. There just isn’t a simple list of it all for a customer to peruse before they have deployed it.

Update - Deploy a Hugo website from GitHub to S3 using GitHub Webhooks, API Gateway and Lambda

Avid readers, I bring to you a nice little update to one of my more popular posts on how to deploy a Hugo website from GitHub to S3 using GitHub Webhooks, API Gateway and Lambda. Since that post, AWS has stated that they will deprecate support for Python 2.7 starting 31st December 2020. Not only that, the requests module has been removed from the AWS SDK for Python so the file downloads that happen in my Lambda function stopped working.

Deploy a Hugo website from GitHub to S3 using GitHub Webhooks, API Gateway and Lambda

If you followed my previous posts on auto deploying a Hugo site from GitHub to S3 (Part 1, Part 2) you may have noticed that GitHub is deprecating the GitHub Services Integration mechanism. This is critical to the auto deployment function so we’ll need an alternative. To add to my woes, I’ve found that the Node deployment package and all of its dependencies involves more maintenance than it deserves. I also noticed that the original Node package was only adding to the target S3 bucket, not performing a sync or equivalent.

Auto deploy a Hugo website from GitHub to S3 - Part 2

This post is part of a series. You’re reading Part 2. Auto deploy a Hugo website from GitHub to S3 - Part 1 Preparing for the AWS Lambda function Now that GitHub notifies AWS of changes, we need to create the “doing” part of our project. We’re going to use AWS’ Lambda service to perform the work. Lambda will execute the function everytime a notification is published to the SNS topic.

Using Docker as an adhoc NodeJS package manager

During my GitHub -> Lambda -> S3 series I needed to download and install NodeJS modules into my project’s working directory. I didn’t really want to install NodeJS and NPM on my Mac as my machine is a daily driver (SysAdmin/Ops) and not really a front or backend dev machine. I could always use a virtual machine but that’s too resource intensive just to download some NPM modules. What’s smaller than a VM?

Auto deploy a Hugo website from GitHub to S3 - Part 1

This post is part of a series. You’re reading Part 1. Auto deploy a Hugo website from GitHub to S3 - Part 2 Introduction For those who don’t know what Hugo is, it’s a static website generator. Its source material is a Hugo template with your content in Markdown. I’ve used it for a while, in fact this blog is generated using Hugo. Hugo can give you an entire site in HTML/CSS and any required Javascript that you can then place anywhere on the web.

Updating a Route53 domain's Name Servers

I recently had the need to update an AWS Route53 domain NS configuration so that it could be protected by CloudFlare. This domain was purchased via Route53. I had updated the hosted zone NS records with the new Name Servers, but the domain continued to point to AWS and it drove me nuts. Turns out there is another section in Route53 where you updated the NS records for your Route53 managed domain.